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Show off your literary fashion sense

January 18, 2013 by  
Filed under Blogs, News, Slideshow

The New Year signifies fresh beginnings and limitless possibilities. And, in case you didn’t know, it’s also when the fashion industry starts setting all the trends you’ll see in the months and years to come.

Fashion Week 2013 is just around the corner (Feb. 7 to 14), in New York. It’s a week when all the top designers will reveal their fall and winter fashions on the runway at Lincoln Center.

Now, I’m no fashionista. Not by a long shot. But I do know that Fashion Week is a big deal. The latest designs are showcased by big-name designers, and all the collections are covered in big-name magazines, such as Vogue.

The most prominent fashion weeks are held in the four fashion capitals of the world: New York, London, Milan and Paris.

Now we can add Ashland, Ky., to that list.

Style from the Stacks is Boyd County Public Library’s contribution to Fashion Week. In our event, on Saturday, Feb. 9, we will showcase fashion inspired by books or libraries. We’re not promising that Diane Von Furstenberg or Tommy Hilfiger will take notice, but we think our event will inspire a lot of fun ideas for men, women and children.

It’s easy to take part: Use your imagination to create an item of clothing, footwear, jewelry, accessory or entire outfit from books, papers, magazines, CDs or any other material you’d find in a library. Or, you can put together an ensemble inspired by a favorite book.

Are you a fan of Holden Caufield, the 16-year-old dropout from J.D. Salinger’s Catcher in the Rye? You can pay homage to the misanthropic teen by incorporating a classic preppy look with oversized fits and loose clothing. Or make reference to Holden’s teen angst by going grunge – with enough fleece, flannel and knitwear to warm New York City in the middle of winter.

Catcher in the Rye is also known for its unacceptable language, so how about an outfit that incorporates words and letters in a creative (and acceptable in the library) sort of way?

Let’s try another classic: Anna Karenina, the 19th-century novel by Leo Tolstoy. Many top fashion designers have recently found inspiration in the 1800s (perhaps prompted by the latest film version) and Fashion Week 2012 runways were full of brocade, fur and lace motifs. Even commercial retailers, such as Banana Republic, got in on the Anna-inspired action.

So, how can you add Anna to your wardrobe (without wearing an entire period costume)? You could contrast the two classes in the book by combining “high society” fabrics such as velvet, fur and lace with “low society” materials like wool, felt and leather.

style from the stacks_jane marple

Other books have inspired fashion designers, and you can get ideas from them, too. Jane Marple is a popular Japanese clothing line that pays homage to the elderly private eye in Agatha Christie’s novels (see photo). Shaftesbury 21 is an Australian company specializing in children’s styles named after either a character or a place from one of the Bronte sisters’ novels. Andemerging designer Prabal Gurung’s fall 2011 line was inspired by the heartbroken Miss Havisham from the classic novel Great Expectations by Charles Dickens.

 

You could also design something based solely on a book cover you like. Take for example, The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath and the sweater (see photo) from Scottish designer Jaggy Nettle.style from the stacks_the bell jar

Or maybe you are a fan of the Harry Potter or Twilight books. Simply dress as your favorite wizard or vampire.

It doesn’t have to be extravagant. Or expensive. No high-priced fashion in Style from the Stacks. Just let your imagination run wild!

We ask that anyone who wants to participate in Style from the Stacks fill out a simple entry form – available at any branch, by Monday, Feb. 4 – just so we can have an idea of who is participating. You can also use the entry form below.

We will have a few fashion-savvy judges on hand for the show, and the winning submissions will be displayed at The Highlands Museum & Discovery Center.

If you have any questions, please call Amanda Clark at 606.329.0518, ext. 1140.

Entry form

Submit this form no later than February 4.

First
Amanda Gilmore

About Amanda Gilmore

Amanda Gilmore is the community relations coordinator for BCPL. She spent 20 years in the newspaper business, and is thrilled to be on the other side - telling our community about all the wonderful library programs and services.

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